Incredible historical cricket artifacts reveal the history of this sport (Part 1)

A series of priceless cricket memos, including Don Bradman’s first bat, have been digitally restored by Google Arts and Culture to bring this rich history of the sport to the life of a ‘game’ gentlemen ‘in the public eye.

Its gift continues to captivate audiences, with heroes of Ben Stokes and Jofra Archer in the latest Ashes test and last month’s World Cup final.

The worldwide cricket audience was stunned, mesmerized, and amazed at the grandeur and daring of the comprehensive player when he reached a record 135 in the last match to win the furniture jaw.

His knock saw him carving his name at the pinnacle of cricket history, with a half going into folklore after saving sensational ashes.

Described as “the best match ever” by English polishing giants Geoffrey Boycott, David Gower and Sir Alastair Cook – Ben Stokes joins an elite club of players Succeed in surpassing this sport.

Google Arts and Culture has released a series of gigapixel images, interactive images and videos to mark the occasion.

A series of historic bats have been shaped as part of the project in collaboration with the historians and museums in the project. Also as a guest from Australian legend Steve Waugh (pictured) holidng the childhood bat of Don Bradman

A series of historic bats have been shaped as part of the project in collaboration with the historians and

The Ashes is one of the fiercest and oldest competitions of all sports and projects from google Arts and Culture brought some of the most iconic artifacts and venues from the competition.

In the photo, the famous memorial piece sparked the notorious competition between England and Australia’s national cricket teams. The fake obituary was written by a journalist, Reginald Shirley Brooks and brought the Sports Times after England’s seven-time defeat to Australia in the 1882 One-Time Exam.